They often repeat repeat themselves.

"Why are you downcast, O my soul? Why so disturbed within me? Put your hope in God, for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God." --Psalm 42:5.

"Why are you downcast, O my soul? Why so disturbed within me? Put your hope in God, for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God." --Psalm 42:11.

"Why are you downcast, O my soul? Why so disturbed within me? Put your hope in God, for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God." --Psalm 43:5.

No, you're not seeing triples. The same verse, word for word, shows up three times within the span of two chapters in Psalm. Usually, when I see something repeated, it means that it's something that the teacher, speaker, etc. wants me to take away from this lesson, speech, etc. When I first looked at this verse, I became frustrated with my constantly flowing questions I had: "Why is David's soul downcast? How could a soul be downcast? What is a soul, technically?" Later, I realized that the importance wasn't that David's soul was downcast but what he did despite of what he was going through. He had every reason to be distraught, causing his soul to be "disturbed" within him: alienation, taunting, oppression, abandonment... What was it that he did? He praised God!
"Not only so, but we also rejoice in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope. And hope does not disappoint the Holy Spirit, whom he has given us" (Romans 5:3-5).
No matter what circumstances come our way, "He is the LORD our God; his judgments are in all the earth. He remembers his covenant forever, the promise he made, for a thousand generations," and one of those promises is found in Joshua: "the LORD your God will be with you wherever you go" (1 Chronicles 16:14-15; Joshua 1:9).

God bless!

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